You don't know what you don't know.. but we do

The typical organization loses 5 percent of its revenue to fraud each year. On average, these fraudulent activities continue for 18 months before they either stop or the fraudster is caught. The median loss per business is about $145,000 although nearly a quarter of cases result in losses over $1 million.

Small businesses and non profits are both the most vulnerable and the least able to weather the financial effect and damaged reputation that comes with these incidents. 

Businesses are vulnerable from the inside and the outside. Technology helps us run businesses more effectively but it also opens the door to potential hacks and data breaches. 

What does the thief attacking your business look like?

 Cybercriminals attacked 3,000 US businesses in 2013. And they weren't all Target.

Cybercriminals attacked 3,000 US businesses in 2013. And they weren't all Target.

 Young, eager and energetic. Employees take on tasks to help. But are they leaving your business exposed?

Young, eager and energetic. Employees take on tasks to help. But are they leaving your business exposed?

 Trustworthy employees with a decade of experience and a personal commitment to your company are both the bedrock of many companies .. and the biggest threat. 

Trustworthy employees with a decade of experience and a personal commitment to your company are both the bedrock of many companies .. and the biggest threat. 


Small businesses are both disproportionately victimized by fraud and notably under-protected by anti-fraud controls, a combination that makes them significantly vulnerable to this threat. While resources available for fraud prevention and detection measures are limited in many small companies, several anti-fraud controls — such as an anti-fraud policy, formal management review procedures and anti-fraud training for staff members — provide a cost-effective investment for protecting these organizations from fraud.
— The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners